Conserving our planet's botanical resources and ecosystems

New ecology education project: “A TREEhouse for Every Child….”

TREE Foundation is proud to announce a new project linking kids to nature for Southwest Florida. The TREE treehouse will be built at Crowley Nature Reserve (exit on Fruitville Road off Interstate 75) as soon as the fund-raising is completed. This “kids-dream-come-true” will feature natural materials, an eagle’s nest upper view spot, environmental educational hands-on activities inside and out, and construction amidst native Florida forest vegetation. TREE Foundation and Crowley Board of Directors are proud to co-sponsor the TREE treehouse, and encourage all local families, philanthropists, and businesses to become part of this special legacy to the next generation of Floridians. Our motto is “a treehouse for every child….” and if successful, this model may be replicated in other neighborhoods.
pledge_postcard
You can make a pledge and be part of this exciting project.  Just click on the graphic above to view a printable PDF version of the pledge card.  You can then fill it out and mail it, along with your check, to:
TREE Foundation
P.O. Box 48839
Sarasota, FL 34230-5839

or

donate online using PayPal:

As Meg Lowman explained in her Nature’s Secrets column, treehouses serve several important biological functions for children who are fortunate enough to experience them:

Treehouses exemplify biophilia, an important term coined by E.O. Wilson that reflects our innate human desire to connect with the natural world. In an evolutionary sense, humans descended from ancestors in the treetops. Anyone who pauses at the zoo to watch a monkey cavorting in the branches is amused, inspired and subtly reminded of something inside that tugs on our evolutionary memory banks.

Treehouses also bring kids into contact with the hotspots of the forest — flowers, new leaves, pollinators, birds, arboreal mammals and millions of beetles. The essence of energy from sunlight all converges in this region high above the forest floor.

Third, canopies undoubtedly produce the purest air on the planet, emanating fresh from greenery that transforms carbon dioxide into useful energy. Oxygen is just one of the byproducts of this important process of photosynthesis. Just as patients appreciate plants in hospitals, perhaps kids benefit from the clean, fresh atmosphere enveloping a treehouse.

Fourth, treehouses are safe sanctuaries in a world of chaos and technology, and elicit the creative energy of youth. (And don’t overlook the fact that they make cozy spots for sleep-overs with best friends!)