Conserving our planet's botanical resources and ecosystems

ARTICLES

How Indian ecologists are finding unknown treasures hidden in the canopies of trees

Walking into a forest is probably one of the most immersive ecological experiences. It isn’t like walking into any other landscape like a mountain or a desert, both of which introduce their marvels at a deliberate pace. When you step into a forest, it is almost as if the edge zips shut behind you. The trees sieve the bright sunlight into twinkling stars, the soggy ground softens your step and the foliage pushes against the world outside.

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Rebecca’s Amazon Adventure

As our plane began its descent toward Iquitos, Peru, I knew I was in for the adventure of a lifetime. I had been anxiously awaiting this trip – my very first international flight – for the past several months, but nothing could prepare me for what I

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Taiwan Explores and Celebrates Her Treetops

Article by Dr. Meg Lowman in the Taiwan Forestry Research Institute Newsletter:

In 2009, two young Taiwanese biologists arrived at my doorstep in Sarasota, Florida, determined to learn everything about the canopy walkway built in nearby Myakka River State Park. This unique treetop walk has not only inspired

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TREE Research Associate Bhaskar Krishnamurthy combines art and science for conservation in India

From The Hindu:
The best way to learn about a country and its culture is to live in the community and follow their daily life, and even better, photograph them to take stories back to friends at home. Students from American high schools have had several such experiences

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“Trees are Like Mothers,” says Meg Lowman

Meg Lowman

From SavingWild.com:
A mother of two grown boys, Meg Lowman compares trees to mothers, “they have a great deal in common.”
“Trees are the heart of productivity of many ecosystems, just as mothers function as the biological center of birth and life, trees provide sustenance for their entire

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Connect with Nature on Earth Day

Meg Lowman, currently Chief of Science and Sustainability at the California Academy of Sciences, pioneered the science of canopy ecology.

Meg Lowman, a scientist and sustainability expert known as the “Einstein of the treetops”, says you should go outside and play.
“Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts.” -Rachel Carson
When you think back to your

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A Visit From a Science Rock Star

As thousands of festival-goers flock to Coachella over the next two weekends, rock stars are on many minds across the country. But here in San Francisco, I’ve been reflecting on a different kind of groupie-worthy icon — the one and only E. O. Wilson, champion of conservation,

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Life on tree-tops

Article below written by Bhaskar Krishnamurthy which features Dr. Lowman and her work in the canopies.
Often considered the eighth continent of our planet, canopies
across the world harbour more than 30% of the Earth’s living
fauna, and yet remain one of the least studied areas till date,
especially in India.

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Informal science education like museums can teach key concepts and fill gaps in STEM education

Excerpt from “Ecoliteracy in informal science education settings” in EcoLiteracy, pp. 474–475:
Specific metrics for the status of US science education indicate that the country is losing its competitive edge on a global scale; among nations, the US ranks 22nd in density of broadband internet penetration and 72nd

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How to Raise a Woman Scientist

“Well behaved women rarely make history.” — Laurel Thatcher Ulrich
Although things have changed considerably for women in the world of science since the brave and bold Marie Curie began paving the way, there are still far too few women pursuing science careers, including my own field of

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