Conserving our planet's botanical resources and ecosystems

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Canopy Meg talks about her passion for treetop exploration, ecology and the Penang Hill project

Canopy Meg

From Malaymail Online:

Dr. Meg Lowman was recently in Penang to attend the First Penang Hill Biodiversity Study Symposium at Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) and she will be partnering with USM researchers in a state initiative to help designate Penang Hill as a Unesco Biosphere Reserve.
Here, the 62-year-old

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International researchers to study Penang Hill’s 130 million-year-old rainforest

 
Article from Malay Mail Online:
GEORGE TOWN, Oct 16 — The research programme on Penang Hill for the Unesco Biodiversity Reserve application will turn the island state into a world-famous research site, said biologist Dr Margaret Lowman.
The American ecologist said even without the Unesco inscription, the area has

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Why Are TREE’S BEZA Books Important?

Beza

Why Are TREE’S BEZA Books Important?
Article by Helen Gold
As you may be aware, TREE FOUNDATION is selling a book called ‘BEZA’. It’s a great story, about an Ethiopian girl who’s trying to save the forests and the biodiversity of northern Ethiopia in every way that she can. It’s an empowering book

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Why Walkways?

Canopy Walkway

Why Walkways?
Article by Helen Gold
Can Canopy Walkways Help To Get Your Kids in Touch With Nature?
Canopy walkways – also known as ‘treetop walks’ – are a dream come true for a nature lover. They provide unprecedented access to the kind of habitat which we are normally locked

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Field Report: Women in Science Summit 2016

D.C. Randle’s field report from the first annual Women in Science Summit hosted at the California Academy of Sciences.
This year, my friend and mentor, Dr. Meg Lowman asked me to join a panel session at the first annual Women in Science Summit hosted at the California Academy

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Gary Braasch – A Tribute to Mother Nature’s Favorite Son

Meg Lowman, currently Chief of Science and Sustainability at the California Academy of Sciences, pioneered the science of canopy ecology.

World-acclaimed photojournalist Gary Braasch died on March 7, 2016 while photographing coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Gary’s passion was to visualize climate change and educate the public about the serious impacts of humans on natural systems. His photographs told vivid stories about global change,

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Gross National Happiness — Bhutan’s Innovative Metric for Good Governance

Meg Lowman, currently Chief of Science and Sustainability at the California Academy of Sciences, pioneered the science of canopy ecology.

The leadership of Bhutan recognizes that one way to ensure the future of GNH — along with its unique value system — is prioritizing access to the natural world for all citizens. Green plants and healthy ecosystems are inextricably linked to human health, a vital part of gross national happiness, and are protected in Bhutan’s environmentally conscious constitution. (Of note, a key drawback to America’s GDP is that it does not measure the value of healthy ecosystems, known as natural capital.) Recently, the King of Bhutan launched a program to protect natural areas, especially national parks. Royal Manas National Park will feature an innovative construction called BATS (Bhutan Aerial Trail System) that entails a massive canopy walkway complex that includes a treetop scientific research station. An international team will work together to develop one of the world’s largest canopy walkway systems to jumpstart research on Bhutan’s biodiversity, but also to infuse a big dose of gross happiness into the fabric of Bhutan’s landscape.

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Ghost sharks, Dracula ants, and other new species of 2015

Dr. Lowman is quoted in this article from cbsnews.com regarding the dozens of new species that have been discovered in 2015.
The far reaches of the globe still hold many secrets, but this year scientists discovered a few more of them: dozens of new species of animals, plants

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Biodiversity goes to extremes

Biodiversity goes to extremes — my son, James Burgess, CEO of Open Biome, is trying to track 2 billion things in our intestines, while I am still struggling with a few million insects in the canopy. What a testament to the times! – Meg Lowman
From the New York

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Drones used for good: catching poachers and mosquitoes

Bryson Voirin, a long-standing TREE Foundation research associate who has devoted much of his research career to sloth ecology, has written this article about how drones are being used for research and conservation efforts around the world.
From the San Franciso Chronicle:
Ask the average passerby what he or

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