Conserving our planet's botanical resources and ecosystems

The faster, fiercer, and always surprising sloth, an interview with Bryson Voirin

Bryson Voirin hanging out in a tree. Photo courtesy of Bryson Voirin.

From Mongabay.com:

Sloths sleep all day; they are always slow; and they are gentle animals. These are just some of the popular misconceptions that sloth-scientist and expert tree-climber, Bryson Voirin, is overturning. After growing up among the wild creatures of Florida, spending his high school years in Germany, and earning a Bachelors degree in biology and environment at the New College of Florida, Voirin found his calling. At the New College of Florida, Voirin “met Meg Lowman, the famous canopy pioneer who invented many of the tree climbing techniques everyone uses today.”

A doctoral student with the Max Planck Institute, Bryson Voirin studies sloths and other species at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. Mongabay.com’s sixth in a series of interviews with ‘Young Scientists’.

Sloths sleep all day; they are always slow; and they are gentle as lambs. These are just some of the popular misconceptions that sloth-scientist and expert tree-climber, Bryson Voirin, is overturning.

After growing up among the wild creatures of Florida, spending his high school years in Germany, and earning a Bachelors degree in biology and environment at the New College of Florida, Voirin found his calling.

At the New College of Florida, Voirin “met Meg Lowman, the famous canopy pioneer who invented many of the tree climbing techniques everyone uses today. After the first day lecture, I realized that this was someone who was doing exactly what I wanted to do. I walked up after class to talk with her and ended up heading down to Panama a few months later with her to help on the set of the JASON Project. With my climbing and science background, it worked out perfectly. Canopy science was it.”

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